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Mind map helps school students learn smart & fast

Tuesday, 27 March 2012 - 9:00am IST | Place: Mumbai | Agency: DNA
Students of NSS Hillspring International School, Tardeo, have created India’s largest mind map for business studies to improve their retention and understanding of concepts.

For students who feel bogged down every year with the prospect of cramming for the exams, here’s an alternative model of learning to help them study smart.

Students of NSS Hillspring International School, Tardeo, have created India’s “largest” mind map for business studies to improve their retention and understanding of concepts.

Measuring around 2,000 sq ft, the monster mind map has been created by 30 students from class 10 of the IGCSE school using a specialised software called iMind map. Mounted on the school facade on Monday, the map is being considered for an entry into the 2013 edition of the Limca Book of Records as the largest mind map in the country.

Indu Shahani, principal of HR College, Churchgate, and the sheriff of Mumbai, said, “Mind maps are a popular tool of thinking in the West, but they have not picked up in India. Students here are bogged down with a huge syllabus and can use mind maps to their advantage,” she said, adding that even the creators of the popular cartoon series The Simpsons had started with a mind map.

Created in just 50 days, the mind map shows a consolidation of learning of two years of business studies. The monster map includes over 27 mind maps linked together as one. Students say that the mind map has helped them grasp concepts better. Besides, business studies, they are also applying it while studying other subjects such as English, the sciences and even art.

Mihika Shipli, a student who worked on the map, said, “Making mind maps helps me organise my thoughts. It helped a lot in my preparation for my prelim exams. It’s a quick way of revision.”

Another student Jay Vaidya said, “Earlier, my way of studying was chapter-driven, but now it has become concept-driven. Instead of reading through more than 40 chapters before the exams, it was easier to take a quick look at 27 maps which give keywords that are easier to remember than entire sentences.”




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