Now, a smart fork that keeps track of eating habits

Monday, 7 January 2013 - 1:15pm IST | Place: Melbourne | Agency: ANI
Due in April, the unusual piece of cutlery has sensors in its base that measure how fast the user is eating, as well as when and how much.

Researchers have designed HAPIfork – a smart fork that will teach users to slow down while eating. Others devices such a one that tracks suitcases in flight, and an iPhone accessory that measures the oxygen in your blood were among the smart and quirky creations revealed overnight before the world’s largest gadget show opens in Las Vegas, news.com.au reported.

But perhaps the most unusual new device came in the form of a “smart fork” called HAPIfork. The unusual piece of cutlery, due in April, has sensors in its base that measures how fast the user is eating, as well as when and how much they’re consuming.

Spokesman Philippe Monteiro Da Rocha said that users could upload eating results to a smartphone and the smart fork was designed to teach users “to eat more slowly to aid digestion. International CES does not officially open for two days, but a preview event revealed health and fitness gadgets as a major trend at the annual event.

Fresh health gadgets included the world’s first consumer device to measure oxygen in the blood, an iPhone accessory called the Masimo iSpO2, and an internet-connected scale from Withings that not only measures a user’s weight and fat content, but reveals how much carbon dioxide builds up in their bedroom as they sleep so they can open a window.

Fitness trackers were another popular new item, with Fitbug releasing a new Bluetooth-connected step counter in the Orb, and Withings revealing a tiny, 8g Smart Activity Tracker that measures steps, incline and, with the touch of a finger, a wearer’s pulse rate.

Other quirky creations included the Trackdot luggage tracker, also due in April, that can be packed in a suitcase and uses a mobile phone connection to update users on the whereabouts of their luggage. The Trackdot device, powered by two AA batteries, turns itself off when the plane picks up speed for safety, a spokesman said, and can even alert users when it appears on the baggage carousel, connecting to its host phone by Bluetooth.


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