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Future terrorists to come from Hindu, Christian religions too, says US report

Wednesday, 26 December 2012 - 2:39pm IST | Place: ISLAMABAD | Agency: ANI
An official US report has warned that future terrorists could come from many different religions, including Christianity and Hinduism. The reports added that right-wing and left-wing ideological groups will also pose threats.

An official US report has warned that future terrorists could come from many different religions, including Christianity and Hinduism. The reports added that right-wing and left-wing ideological groups will also pose threats.

The report, however said it hopes that the withdrawal of US forces from Iraq and a reduced military presence in Afghanistan will also decrease the terrorists' ability to use America for stirring up Muslim anger, reports The Dawn.

"The Future of Terrorism" is part of a larger report that studies global trends between now and 2030.

The report stated that US support for Israel could be the last remaining major focus of Muslim anger. It further said that several circumstances are ending the current Islamist phase of terrorism, indicating that "the recent religious wave is receding and could end by 2030".

It further said that terrorism is unlikely to die completely because it has no single cause.

The report stated that although Al-Qaeda and others have focused on the United States as a clear enemy, the appeal of the United States as the "great enemy" is declining.

According to the report, moral resurgence of secular democracy in the Arab world will also help defuse terrorism as the Arab uprisings were non-violent struggles. It added that future generations in the Arab and Muslim worlds may not agree with the perceptions of the older generations and may not want to carry on their battles.

The report stated that many states might continue to use terrorist groups; exploiting terrorist movements out of a strong sense of insecurity. It claimed that states such as Pakistan and Iran feel threatened by what they perceive as stronger, threatening powers in their regions or globally.

Therefore, they seek asymmetric options to assert power and deter attack; using terrorist groups as proxies and pursuing nuclear weapons are two such asymmetric tools.

However, the report concludes by saying that international disapproval of state support for terrorist movements has increased significantly, and the costs to a regime of directly supporting terrorists looks set to become even greater as international cooperation increases.


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