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Commonwealth Games: Osayemi Oludamola stripped of her gold medal

Wednesday, 13 October 2010 - 1:44am IST | Place: New Delhi | Agency: dna
The gold medal will now be awarded to Natasha Mayers of St Vincent and the Grenadines, the silver to Katherine Endacott of England and bronze to Bertille Delphine Atangana of Cameroon

Women’s 100 metres champion Osayemi Oludamola of Nigeria was on Tuesday stripped of her gold medal following a positive ‘B’ sample test.

On Tuesday, another Nigerian athlete, Samuel Okon, who finished sixth in the 110m hurdles, was the second athlete to test positive for methylhexaneamine, the same substance for which Oludamola had tested positive.

The gold medal will now be awarded to Natasha Mayers of St Vincent and the Grenadines, the silver to Katherine Endacott of England and bronze to Bertille Delphine Atangana of Cameroon.

Announcing the second positive dope test of the Games, Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) president Mike Fennell said on Tuesday, “We have now conducted 1,200 tests and I have to report a second doping violation. Nigerian 110m hurdler Samuel Okon has tested positive for the same substance (as Oludamola).”

He said a provisional hearing would be held later.
Given that methylhexaneamine has figured in several positive drug tests, Fennell admitted that supplements could be the culprit, and that the unregulated supplement industry posed a threat to the wellbeing of athletes and common people.

“We are concerned with the number of incidents that are coming up with the same substance. At this stage I cannot speak very definitively as to where it’s coming from but it appears that it may be coming from the use of supplements. The supplement industry is unregulated worldwide, and that is of concern. They are strongly advertised and pose a strong appeal for people to use. It’s a mega industry worldwide, worth around US $86 billion. Many contain ingredients that are banned.”

Fennell said athletes and coaches have been warned not to purchase supplements based solely on the list of ingredients printed on the containers. “They should not pay attention only to the (list of) ingredients, because that is unreliable,” said Fennell.

“Many are misled into using these supplements. I would like to see more attention given to the educational side. Most of these supplements do not assist (performance) or function as they promise.”




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