Google building Android cars; ropes in Audi, GM, Honda and Hyundai to make it a reality before 2014 ends

Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 6:25pm IST Updated: Thursday, 9 January 2014 - 6:29pm IST | Place: Mumbai | Agency: DNA Web Team
With the help of chipmaker NVIDIA, the group aims to bring Google's Android operating system to the auto industry on a large scale.

Google is taking things to another level to pimp your cars up. To bring a more evolved experience  Google has teamed up with many automotive companies to form the Open Automotive Alliance. This aims at bringing Android platform to a device that's always been mobile — the car.

Audi, GM, Google, Honda, Hyundai and NVIDIA have joined together to form the Open Automotive Alliance (OAA), a global alliance of technology and auto industry leaders committed to bringing the Android platform to cars starting in 2014

With the help of chipmaker NVIDIA, the group aims to bring Google's Android operating system to the auto industry on a large scale.

The speed with which Android will be adopted by the industry remains unclear.  However, Open Automotive Alliance is committed to bringing the Android platform to cars before the end of 2014.

"Partnering with Google and the OAA on an ecosystem that spans across vehicles and handheld mobile devices furthers our mission to bring vehicles into our owners digital lives and their digital lives into their vehicles," said Mary Chan, President of General Motors' Global Connected Consumer unit.

There is not much information about how the Android experience really will be in a car. On it's official site, OAA has written, "We're working with our partners to enable better integration between cars and Android devices to create a safer, car optimised experience. We're also developing new Android platform features that will help the car itself to become a connected Android device."

This is definitely welcome news as internet-enabled cars were foreseen as an expected reality long ago. Hopefully this will make the driving experience much more safer as gadgets used currently requires multi-tasking.


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