G-spot a myth, claim British scientists

Sunday, 3 January 2010 - 1:15pm IST | Agency: ANI
After surveying more than 1,800 women, scientists at King's College London concluded, 'the idea of a G-spot is subjective,'.

After years of bedroom exploration and debate, a row about the location of the fabled G-spot might be finally over - but in vain.

A study by British scientists claims the sexual pleasure zone doesn't exist at all.

After surveying more than 1,800 women, scientists at King's College London concluded, "the idea of a G-spot is subjective," reports The Times.

"Women may argue that having a G-spot is due to diet or exercise, but in fact it is virtually impossible to find real traits," said Tim Spector, professor of genetic epidemiology, who co-authored the research.

"This is by far the biggest study ever carried out and it shows fairly conclusively that the idea of a G-spot is subjective."

To reach the conclusion, scientists quizzed 1,804 British women aged 23-83. All were pairs of identical or non-identical twins.

Identical twins share all their genes, while non-identical pairs share 50 percent of theirs. If one identical twin reported having a G-spot, this would raise the chances of her sister of having one too. But no such pattern emerged, suggesting the G-spot is a matter of the woman's subjective opinion.

While 56percent of women overall claimed to have a G-spot, they tended to be younger and more sexually active.

Andrea Burri, who led the research, said: "It is rather irresponsible to claim the existence of an entity that has never really been proven and pressurise women - and men, too."

"I think this study proves the difference between popular science and biological or anatomical science," said Gedis Grudzinskas, consultant gynaecologist at London Bridge hospital.

The Gräfenberg Spot, or G-Spot, is a term used to describe the area of the vagina that might contain an erogenous zone which when stimulated can lead to high levels of sexual arousal and powerful orgasms.

The term "G-Spot" was coined in 1981after the German gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg who hypothesised its existence in a paper published in 1950.




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