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Wannabe mothers line up for 12/12/12 babies

Wednesday, 14 November 2012 - 2:00am IST | Place: Mumbai | Agency: DNA
This trend of having muhurat babies – or planned caesarean section on special dates – is getting fashionable among parents, say city gynaecologists.

It’s the last chance of the decade to have a unique, memorable birth date — 12/12/12. And expectant parents are lining up for that moment. Ahead of December 12, 2012, couples are preparing to fix this unique birth date for their newborns.

This trend of having muhurat babies – or planned caesarean section on special dates – is getting fashionable among parents, say city gynaecologists who get requests from patients wanting babies on their ‘auspicious’ day.

Over the last few years, dates with repetitive numbers all through the the ‘DD-MM-YY’ format are becoming a craze, says doctors. Last year, 2011, it was 11-11-11 and ditto for the earlier years.

Dr Rishma Dhillon-Pai, senior gynaecologist at Jasolok hospital said a patient’s request for planned caesarean section on a special date is respected if the delivery date is around that unique date.

“Of course, the patient has to be fit and free of any complication,” she says, adding that besides date, it’s also a scheduled muhurat -given by a pandit at which parents want their babies to arrive.

Consultant gynaecologist Kiran Coelho says such requests are one too many.

“Already, I have got two requests for 12-12-12, and maybe we’ll will get more in the coming days,” said Dr Coelho. “I do planned deliveries only when it’s possible.”

Medical experts say that while complying with requests for muhurat babies, no doctor risks the patient’s life. It’s only if doctors find it as a fit case for C-section, do they give a commitment to the patient.

At Dr LH Hiranandani hospital, Powai, requests for the ‘all 12 babies’ have already started pouring in, says Dr Anita Soni, “So far, we’ve got three requests for planned deliveries on this special day.”

However, the muhurat moment fad, say doctors, goes beyond the moment a baby is born.

Nowadays, it has spilled onto other medical procedures.

“At times, we get requests from patients wanting the surgical incision done on their body at a specific time,” said Dr Sanjay Borude, bariatric surgeon at Breach Candy hospital.

“Unlike baby deliveries, all our surgeries are planned; none is an emergency.”


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