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Autorickshaw driver revs up to save child’s life

Monday, 11 February 2013 - 4:00am IST | Place: Mumbai | Agency: DNA
Medically, Bhavika’s condition is called ‘central idiopathic precocious puberty’. At her age, the infant has developed breasts and body parts like a 10-year-old girl.

An autorickshaw driver from Nallasopara drives through the lanes of Santacruz at night and, during the day, collects money from charitable trusts to treat his infant daughter who has a rare disorder. The two-and-half-year-old suffers from precocious puberty – a hormonal disorder in which sexual organs and bones are developed like that of an adult.
Sanjay Giri, 33, needs Rs15 lakh for the treatment of his little Bhavika and he is currently struggling to collect this amount.

Medically, Bhavika’s condition is called ‘central idiopathic precocious puberty’. At her age, the infant has developed breasts and body parts like a 10-year-old girl.

Giri says that when Bhavika was just 18-month-old, there used to be vaginal discharge which the family thought it was due to loss of calcium. “But four months ago, she had her menstrual cycle and that scared us, especially since the child had developed breasts like a grown-up girl,” said Giri, adding that the doctor told them that she was seeing such a case for the first time in her career.

An x-ray report revealed that she had bones like a grown-up kid’s, said the girl’s mother Manisha. “Now, doctors have said that she needs a certain injection leuprolide depot) every month till she turns 12. The cost of each injection is Rs10,000,” said Manisha.

Not easy for the family, considering that Giri makes about Rs7,500 a month by plying his autorickshaw which is barely enough for basic needs for the family of three. “If she is not given the injection, she could develop severe problems. Though I’m doing my best to save my child, I’m also losing hope,” says Giri.

The doctor of the civic-run Bhabha Hospital in Bandra where the child is being treated also said this is a rare case. “If the girl is not treated at the earliest, her condition might worsen... Injections are the only resort and must continue till she is 12,” said Dr Anil Patil, assistant medical officer.




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