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Recipients thank 15 families for new lease of life

Thursday, 29 November 2012 - 4:33pm IST | Place: Ahmedabad | Agency: DNA
In an emotionally-charged atmosphere, several donor families were overcome with tears as they narrated their decision to donate the organs of their loved ones.

Around 15 donor families who donated the organs of their deceased loved ones were felicitated by the Institute of Kidney Diseases and Research Centre (IKDRC) at Civil Hospital.
Recipients of the organs also expressed their gratitude to the families for helping them give a second chance at life.

In an emotionally-charged atmosphere, several donor families were overcome with tears as they narrated their decision to donate the organs of their loved ones.

The donors cut across barriers of caste and class. A neurosurgeon and the son of a labourer both shared the platform after they decided to donate the organs of their brain dead fathers.
Speaking on the occasion, Dr HL Trivedi, director of IKDRC said that cadaver transplant remains a big challenge. The institute has carried out 300 cadaver donations so far.

“Across the world, 80% transplants happen through cadaver donation while in India 80% of it happen through live donations. There is a need to reverse this trend,” said Dr Trivedi. He also said that soon pancreas transplant will also be possible at the insistute and in future even heart and limb transplant may be taken up.

The event also saw Priyadrashini Chaudhary Shah, a transplant co-ordinator, being awarded the Dhadichi Rishi Seva Saman for her work in transplant co-ordination and convincing families of brain dead people to donate their organs.

“We need to spread awareness about it to help cadaver donations go up. Proper counselling is also needed. There have been 300 cadaver donations in this hospital alone,” said Shah.

She said that on an average families of only two of 10 brain dead patients agree to donate organs. Dr Vijay Sheth, a neurosurgeon, who had donated the organs of his father after the latter was declared brain-dead, said often it is worry about the cremation process getting extended that prevents families from going for it.

Dr Sheth, who has also helped co-ordinate several other cadaver organ transplants, said that a mere 10% of the brain dead patients’ families agree for the organ donation.

“Several factors including their reluctance to see the deceased’s body being cut open, religious beliefs etc prevent families from donating the organs,” said Dr Sheth.

The mother of Ankur More, a youth who received a liver through cadaver donation, thanked the donor’s family in an emotional speech. “My son is alive today because of you,” she said.

Another recipient, Draupadi Bighana, even went on to thank the donor’s family with a shawl and a bouquet.
 


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