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India waiting for Irish probe into death of Indian woman

Thursday, 15 November 2012 - 5:42pm IST | Place: New Delhi | Agency: PTI
The embassy of Ireland in New Delhi said the Irish government, at the highest level, is committed to establishing the full circumstances and facts surrounding the incident.

Concerned over the circumstances in which an Indian woman dentist died in Ireland, India today said it is awaiting the results of two probes ordered by Irish authorities in the matter and will "take it from there".

The embassy of Ireland in New Delhi said the Irish government, at the highest level, is committed to establishing the full circumstances and facts surrounding the incident.

"We deeply regret the tragic death of Savita Halappanavar. The death of an Indian national in such circumstances is a matter of concern. Our embassy in Dublin is following the matter closely," official spokesperson in the Ministry of External Affairs, Syed Akbaruddin, said.

Akbaruddin said the MEA has also conveyed its sympathies to the family of the deceased.

Halappanavar, 31, died in Ireland due to blood poisoning after doctors allegedly refused to terminate her 17-week-long pregnancy, telling her that "this is a Catholic country".

Akbaruddin also said "we understand that the Irish authorities have initiated two inquiries. We are awaiting the results of these inquiries and we will take it from there."

Terming the death a "terrible tragedy", the Irish Embassy, said in a statement that "an investigation into the circumstances surrounding Mrs Halappanavar’s death has been ordered by the Health authorities in Ireland and the investigation team, which will include independent external expertise, will be liaising with Mrs Halappanavar's family.

"The Irish Prime Minister and the Minister for Health spoke on the matter in Irish Parliament yesterday and expressed their deepest condolences to the husband and family of Mrs Halappanavar. The Embassy wishes to express its own sympathies to the family at this very difficult time."

It also said "the Irish government, at the highest level, is committed to establishing the full circumstances and facts surrounding Mrs Halappanavar's tragic death."

Savita's husband Praveen Halappanavar, an engineer at Boston Scientific in Galway, told Irish media that his wife had asked several times over a three-day period that the pregnancy be terminated. This was refused, he said, because the foetal heartbeat was still present and they were told "this is a Catholic country".


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