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BJP dares Congress to debate on Narendra Modi's economic vision for the country

Saturday, 1 March 2014 - 11:03am IST | Agency: ANI

The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) challenged the Congress to have an open debate on the economic contours of Modi's economic vision; a day after the BJP's prime ministerial candidate put forth his views for revival of the country's sagging economy.

BJP Spokesperson Prakash Javadekar took a dig at Congress for being "silent" after Modi came out with his economic agenda and took pot shots at the Congress saying it seems a snake has stunned them.

"BJP challenges Congress for an open debate on the ideas presented by Narendra Modi yesterday about the contours of revival of the Indian economy", said Javadekar.

Outlining his vision for Indian economy, Modi had said in meetings that that the country's millions of family-owned traders must learn to work with large modern shops and online retailers.

Modi had also emphasised on increasing the purchasing power of the common people, as it would enhance earnings of the small traders.

He also said that India needed to cut red tape by reducing the number of laws, and called on the foreign ministry to focus on "economic diplomacy" to improve the countyr's commercial standing in the world.

Speaking over praises from the former Tamil Nadu chief minister and Dravida Munnettra Kazhagam (DMK) chief M. Karunanidhi, whose comments on Modi's economic vision had sparked speculations about a possible alliance between the BJP and DMK, Javadekar said he would welcome comments from all the political parties including Congress.

"As far as the comments of Karunanidhi are concerned, I welcome not only the masses, but also leaders of other parties to talk about the ideas of Narendra Modi about revival of the economy. It's just the Congress which is silent about his ideas", said Javadekar.

In an interview 'Dinamalar, Karunanidhi had praised Narendra Modi, and referred to him as a "hard worker" and "friend".

His party, DMK, was part of the BJP-led National Democratic Alliance government, before it withdrew its support before the 2004 general elections. 


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