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BASIC countries ask developed nations to 'walk the talk'

Friday, 8 August 2014 - 6:04pm IST | Place: New Delhi | Agency: PTI

Environment Ministers of BASIC countries including India and China on Friday said developed countries should "walk the talk" in addressing climate change in keeping with their historic responsibilities.

"...we expect that developed world should walk the talk," Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar said at the end of the 18th ministerial meeting on climate change here, reiterating a position held by the BASIC countries.

"What we found out is that even on the mitigation front, actions of the BASIC countries of South Africa, Brazil, China and ours, are more concrete than the developed world.

"I will suggest that we will make a compendium of what we have done and put up before the forthcoming UN Climate Summit meeting in September," he told reporters.

Vice Chairman of the National Development and Reform Commission of China, Xie Zhenhua said 60% of the cut in emission is contributed by the developing countries.

He said discussions between US and China at the bilateral level is shared with the BASIC countries, allying apprehensions that bilateral meetings were diluting multilateral discussions on climate change.

In a joint statement, the Ministers' urged developed countries to implement their commitments towards developing countries for provision of finance, technology and capacity-building support.

They emphasised that the developed countries should take the lead in addressing climate change in accordance with their historical responsibilities, the latest available scientific evidence on climate change trends.

Earlier, speaking at the meeting, Javadekar had also sought enhanced action by developing countries.

The 18th Basic Meeting here preceded the crucial UN Climate summit meeting in September called by UN Secretary General and the crucial session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris next year. 
 




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