Health News: How to fix a broken market in antibiotics; US citizen tested for Ebola in Ghana; E-cigarette researchers count puffs

Monday, 7 July 2014 - 6:54pm IST | Agency: Reuters

Here is some of the Health news from around the globe.

- How to fix a broken market in antibiotics -

The drugs don't work - and neither does the market, when it comes to antibiotics. When sophisticated bugs that medicines used to kill within days start to fight back and win, all of healthcare, and the people it keeps alive, is in trouble.

- US citizen tested for Ebola in Ghana -

A US citizen in Ghana is being tested for Ebola after he fell ill following a trip to two countries in the region battling the disease, a senior government official said on Monday. "He is an American and records showed that he had been to Guinea and Sierra Leone in the past few weeks," a senior health ministry official told Reuters. Test results are expected later on Monday. The Ministry of Health said in a statement a patient, who has not been named, was in quarantine at Nyaho clinic in Accra and tests were being conducted at Noguchi Memorial Institute of Medical Research in Accra. It urged the public to remain calm.

- Marijuana shortage seen ahead of Washington state retail pot rollout -

His glass pipes are on display and final regulatory hurdles nearly cleared, but the biggest concern for Cannabis City owner James Lathrop as he opens his Seattle pot shop this week is the possibility of running out of mind-altering bud in a matter of hours. "What do you do when your shelves are empty? Do I just send everybody home? Do we try and stay open? I can't pay people if we aren't selling anything," said Lathrop, who expects to become one of Washington state's first legal marijuana retailers this week as the state issues licenses.

- As millions vape, e-cigarette researchers count puffs, scour Facebook -

One team of researchers assessing the risks of electronic cigarettes is counting the puffs taken by volunteer "vapers." Another will comb Facebook for posts on how people are tinkering with e-cigarettes to make the devices deliver extra nicotine. A third is building a virtual convenience store for 13-to-17-year-olds, measuring how e-cigarette displays and price promotions influence whether minors buy the increasingly popular devices. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is spending $270 million on these and 45 other research projects to determine the risks of e-cigarettes before millions more Americans become hooked on the devices.


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