Home »  Academy

Results of over thousand TYBCom students missing from MU site

Friday, 8 June 2012 - 8:30am IST | Place: Mumbai | Agency: DNA
Mumbai University (MU) and goof-ups go hand in hand. After a series of paper leaks this year which further dented the reputation of the university, the MU has erred yet again.

Mumbai University (MU) and goof-ups go hand in hand. After a series of paper leaks this year which further dented the reputation of the university, the MU has erred yet again.

Two days after the TYBCom results were declared on Tuesday, it has emerged that the roll numbers of over thousand students are missing from the university’s website. Some numbers in a series such as 4664 to 4684 show no results. These students are clueless about their performance and are now running from pillar to post to ensure that the error is rectified at the earliest.

The university on Tuesday declared TYBCom results of 61,000 students who took the 60:40 syllabus (a two-hour 60-marks paper and 40 marks for internal assessment) introduced in the academic year 2011-12.

Nearly 40 of the 400 students enrolled at Jai Hind College got a rude shock when they logged on to the university website after the results were out. “When we enter our roll numbers, the website says no such seat number is available,” the aggrieved students told DNA. Many students from National College, Mithibai College, AK Joshi College (Thane) and CKT College (Panvel) had similar complaints. Ironically, the results of failures are available on the website.

The colleges said the university messed up in its eagerness to declare the results in a hurry. The colleges said the MU has not even sent them a copy of the results. “We are yet to get the results of students,” said National College principal Dinesh Panjwani. The results of 18 students from the college are missing.

University officials, however, denied that they erred despite the fact that several roll numbers are missing.

It has also emerged that many students have filled up wrong paper codes, reflecting either lack of communication from the supervisors or an error in distributing the correct paper. There were three types of papers for TYBCom students – of 60 marks (for first-timers), 80 marks (for students giving the old-pattern paper) and 100 marks (distance education students).

To avoid confusion, the papers were prepared in three colours with three different codes. “Yet, some supervisors made a blunder. Over 100 first-time students wrote IDOL’s code (institute of distance and open learning) as their paper code. We do not know if they attempted the wrong paper too,” said director of examination Subhash Deo.

The supervisors also highlighted wrong circles on the optical mark registration (OMR) sheets, resulting in many students being marked absent. “The colleges did not train supervisors properly for the OMR system. Few have not even sent proper details of the students’ internal assessment marks. Now, we have a huge task of rectifying these errors manually,” Deo said. He said the university would declare the results of these students within a week.

The OMR system introduced in 2011-12 has invited severe criticism. The university’s statistics department in March prepared a report about the complex system. The MU said it would simplify it from next year. “Last year 4,000 students made mistakes in the OMR coding. This year, the number is lower,” Deo said.
 


Jump to comments